Alastair Borthwick, Nature Writer and Broadcaster

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Alastair Borthwick, a writer and broadcaster, was born on February 17, 1913. He grew up in Troon, Ayrshire. He attended high school in Glasgow where he went to live at age 11. At 16, he took a job at the Evening Times as copy taker, then went to the Glasgow Weekly Herald.

His role at the Weekly Herald included editing and producing the children’s, women’s, and film pages. His work led to the discovery of his passion for nature and rock-climbing, and to the writing of his 1939 book, Always A Little Further, seen as portraying an escape from the stress associated with city life. He moved to London in 1935 to work for the Daily Mirror but only stayed there for about a year.

He signed up for military service in WWII and rose to the rank of captain, working mostly as a battalion intelligence officer. Just prior to VE Day his colonel excused him from parades to allow him to write about the last three years of his battalion’s campaign in the war. The book he wrote was praised as a classic of the war literature genre.

After the war, Borthwick and his wife moved into a small cottage on the coast of Jura away from city living and close to nature. That was on Christmas Day 1945. They stayed there for seven years and had a son, Patrick.

Borthwick did a series, Scottish Survey, on post-war Scotland for the BBC on contract for three years. He gained the OBE for work in a presentation on heavy engineering in Glasgow in 1951. In 1952 he and his wife relocated to Islay, then back to Ayrshire in 1960. They spent the rest of their lives there.

Alastair Borthwick for many years, wrote a column weekly, for News Chronicle. From the 1960s he also wrote scripts and presented programs for Grampian TV on a variety of subjects. They included his favored 13-part series of Scottish Soldier which gave the story of the Scottish infantry from the infantryman’s perspective.

Alastair Borthwick died on September 25, 2003, at the age of 90.

https://www.undiscoveredscotland.co.uk/usbiography/b/alastairborthwick.html

 

The War of Alastair Borthwick

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In 1929 when he was only 16, the Scottish writer Alastair Borthwick dropped out of high school

 to get an editing and writing job with the Glasgow Herald. In 1935 he left the Glasgow Herald and Glasgow, in general, to take up a writing position with the Daily Mirror in London. About a year later he left that position, moved back to Glasgow and started working for BBC. He would remain a prized member of its staff as a writer and broadcaster for many years. In 1938 he led the Press Club during the 1938 Empire Expedition. 

In 1939 he wrote and published his classic novel, “Always a Little Further,” which chronicles the growing Scottish mountaineering movement among the common citizens at that time. While the movement was already going on since the early 30s, Borthwick’s novel was instrumental in encouraging its massive growth. The year after its publication, Borthwick joined Scotland’s fight throughout World War II. For most of the last two years he served as the Intelligence Officer for the 5th Seaforth Highlanders. During the entirety of the war, he saw much fierce action and served with great honor.

His was one of the fiercest and most amazing war stories that you will hear. His most highly applauded task came one night when he successfully led 600 men across enemy lines in the pitch dark and without any trustworthy maps. It is incredibly he lived through it all. In the last few weeks of the war, his superiors allowed him to sit out the remainder of it in order to write a memoir of the wars in the last three years. The result “Sans Peur: The History of the 5th Battalion, the Seaforth Highlanders, 1942-1945” was published in 1946. After the war, he would remain working with BBC. His final broadcast was in 1995. Alastair and his wife, Anne, both died in 2003 just months apart. 

https://www.amazon.com/Life-Among-Scots-Alastair-Borthwick/dp/B000MU14SK 

Grupo RBS Is One Of Brazil’s Most Successful Media Companies

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Grupo RBS is one of Brazil’s largest media organizations, and they are responsible for managing numerous outlets. Not only do they manage television and radio stations, but they also manage a company that does book publishing, newspapers, and websites. The company has been in business since 1957.

Here’s what you need to know about some of the most important outlets that they manage:

 

Grupo RBS Manages Three Large TV Stations

The company manages two television channels that are active on a national level, and they also manage a station exclusively for Florianopolis. Their national channels are RBS TV and OCTO OC. Their Florianopolis station is TVCOM.

 

Grupo RBS Has Greatly Improved Their Radio Stations

RBS has made major improvements to their radio stations that has allowed them to reduce their budget considerably. In fact, Gaucha and Zero Hora recently have shaved 5 million dollars off of their annual expenses, and this has boosted their profits 74%. Grupo RBS works hard to make sure that the stations create popular programs.

 

The Company Manages Multiple Sources Of Print Media

The company’s newspapers can be read either online or offline, and they feature local, national, and world news. In addition, their book publishing company has been responsible for the creation of numerous publications that are popular among Brazilian citizens, and it’s likely to continue to succeed in the future. Read This Article to learn more.

 

What You Need To Know About Their Outreach Programs

They have several outreach programs, and two of them are aimed at improving the lives of children. One of these programs improves the elementary education system in Brazil, and the other program is aimed at encouraging people in Brazil to focus on the children in their lives. In addition, Grupo RBS have an outreach program that’s aimed at preventing traffic violence.

 

Follow them on https://twitter.com/grupo_rbs